Grand Marshal for 2016 Walk

Doug Wyman and Barbara

The Planning Committee has selected a Grand Marshal for the 2016 CROP Hunger Walk. The person we selected is a tireless member of our team and more importantly an activist on the issue of hunger and homelessness. Shown here with his wife Barbara, they continue their 65+ years of marriage and commitment to one another.

Doug Wyman has helped the CROP Hunger Walk for the past 10 years.  He started as a crossing guard and elevated his role on the team to raise money from businesses in the area. He is consistently a top fund raiser for the walk. His positive attitude affects all team members for raising money.  He believes in lofty goals which can be achieved.  Our goal of raising $100,000.00 this year is one he championed, just as he continues to champion the issue of hunger and homelessness. To hear his story of how he become involved, listen to his story recorded in 2014.

As if that is not enough at the tender age of 87, years old he is the co-host of The Doris Davenport Show with Doug Wyman, heard locally on 1490 AM WPNA on Sunday nights from 6:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. To see some of the programs go to their archive to see videos of past programs.

Doug and Doris

He has also volunteered with the Housing Forward.  “I think I bring a sense of history and some wisdom to the program,” he said. His work at PADS for the last 20 years shows his heart and character for people in need or food and shelter.  Here is a video he did for them several years ago.  What he says, still holds true

You can now see why he was selected as the Grand Marshal for the 2016 CROP Hunger Walk.

Join Doug Wyman on Sunday, May 1st at the start of the 33rd annual CROP Hunger Walk.

Sign up and walk with Doug and hundreds of people walking with the goal of “ending hunger one step at a time.”

 

 

Hunger Effects Education

We are a society that seeks to have the brightest kids in our school system. We want to nurture them with knowledge, to help them learn and grow. There are, however, things that impact the ability to learn. One of them is food. 3 out of 4 public school teachers say that students regularly come to school hungry. 81% say it happens at least once a week, according to No Kid Hungry. Educators agree that kids need to start the day with a healthy breakfast in order to do well in school. But though nearly every school offers breakfast, 50% of teachers still say the problem has increased.

Many of the people who are on the CROP Hunger Walk committee and those who walk, have seen the impact of the lack of food for children.  I’ve been to a PADS evening to make food and feed the people who seek out food and shelter for the night. The work that  Housing Forward, one of the 7 agencies we support, does in providing shelter, called PADS Shelter, which accommodates 43-70 individuals nightly, depending on location. A lottery system is used when there are more clients than beds available. On some nights people are turned away for the shelter they seek. Each night, usually a church, houses people seeking food and shelter.  This is all done by volunteers who have a sense of giving to people in need.

Among that group of people are families with children seeking these services. I have seen their faces and their eyes looking forelorn. The meals that are provided may be the only food they have for the day.

The CROP Hunger Walk’s mission is to spread the word on the issue of hunger and in so doing, raising money for this cause.  Distributed locally, 25% of the total raised, and 75% to the work that Church World Service does in the United States and around the world.

Please join us Sunday, May 1st for the 33rd Annual CROP Hunger Walk.  Sign up here and make yourself known for helping in this cause.

Have a story about hunger, please share with us by using the reply section below.

Co-Chair To Speak on The Doris Davenport Show

T&J CROP PhotoWe have been busy telling you about the issue of hunger and the CROP Hunger Walk Sunday May 1, 2016 on our social media platforms, including this blog. Our last blog give a detailed overview of the Doris Davenport Show with Doug Wyman, also a planning team member of the CROP Hunger Walk.

One of the things that makes the walk successful is the work that the planning committee does on behalf of the walk.  Organizing people, dates, places and events, along with many other things that make the walk run smoothly.  Soliciting volunteers and working with them to make the walk a fun and worthwhile event with our tag line of “Ending Hunger One Step At A Time” is a goal of theirs and all the team members.

Joanne Despotes co-chair and Ted Despotes Treasurer, have worked tirelessly to make the walk run smoothly.  They are doing all of the things they can, along with other team members, to make this walk the event that it is.

This week-end, Sunday, April 10, 2016 from 7:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. you can hear Joanne and Ted talk about the evolution of the walk, now in our 33rd year.  Please remember that over these 33 years the CROP Hunger Walk has raised over 1.3 million dollars.

You can tune in to The Doris Davenport Show, 1490 AM or a live stream.

Promo Flyer April 10

Join us on Sunday, May 1, 2016 by signing up today.

Like the show?  Give us some feedback.

CWS is working with partners in Nepal

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CWS is working with partners ACT Alliance and Lutheran World Federation in Nepal

Over 3,600 people are known to have died in a massive earthquake which hit Nepal on Saturday. More than 6,500 people have been injured. The 7.9 magnitude earthquake was the country’s worst natural disaster in more than 80 years.

Members of ACT Alliance which have been working in Nepal for several years are on the ground and already working to assist many who have survived the quake, by distributing immediate life-saving supplies such as water, food, shelter and medication.

“People are suffering and need urgent assistance,” said Reshma Adatia, ACT Alliance’s Global Humanitarian Coordinator.”Their priority needs are water, shelter and hygiene.”

Everything is still in chaos in Kathmandu, and access to information about the situation in more remote areas is limited, due to the destruction of communications channels.

CWS works with partners to eradicate hunger and poverty and work for peace and justice in the world.

This is another example of where you money goes when you join the CROP Hunger Walk.

You can help: by click on this link.

The classroom has become a dining room

child hungryWe just talked about world hunger and that which is right around our corner.  Locally we walk to raise money for local agencies that help people in need.

Just as important are the facts contained in this article about how public schools have become the dining room and the “last frontier” for many children to get food.

While food is essential for living it is also essential for learning.  Without nutrition it is difficult to concentrate and focus on learning when you are yearning for food.

Nationwide, one in five households with children are considered food insecure, which means people in the household are at risk of going hungry or missing meals or don’t know where their next meal is coming from.

Join us Sunday, May 3rd on our 32nd annual CROP Hunger Walk.  Join the walk or Donate now.

Hunger and World Poverty


Some people question why the CROP Hunger Walk gives 75% of the money raised to people overseas and only 25% remains here. The answer is that while nutrition is a problem in the U.S. almost no one dies from starvation—from a heart attack because of obesity maybe, but not from hunger. Following are some statistics.

Hunger and World Poverty. About 21,000 people die every day of hunger or hunger-related causes, according to the United Nations. This is one person every four seconds, as you can see on this display. Sadly, it is children who die most often.                                       Sub-Saharan Africa is the region with the highest prevalence (percentage of population) of hunger. One person in four there is undernourished. Poor nutrition causes nearly half (45%) of deaths in children under five – 3.1 million children each year.

United Sates. In 2011 16.7 million children lived in food-insecure households, about 35% more than 2007 levels, though only 1.1% of U.S. children, or 845,000, saw reduced food intake or disrupted eating patterns at some point during the year, and most cases were not chronic. Almost 16 million children lived in food-insecure households in 2012. Schools throughout the country had 21 million children participate in a free or reduced lunch program and 11 million children participate in a free or reduced breakfast program. The extent of American youth facing hunger is clearly shown through the fact that 47% of SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) participants are under the age of 18. The states with the highest rate of food insecure children were North Dakota, Minnesota, Virginia, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts as of 2012.

  1. 1 in 6 people in America face hunger.
  2. ”Food insecurity” refers to USDA’s measure of lack of access, at times, to enough food for all household members. Households with children reported a significantly higher food insecurity rate than households without children in 2011: 20.6% vs. 12.2%.
  3. Food insecurity exists in every county in America. In 2011, 17.9 million households were food insecure. More and more people are relying on food banks and pantries. Collect food outside your local supermarket for a local food bank. Sign up for Supermarket Stakeout.
  4. 50.1 million Americans struggle to put food on the table.
  5. In the US, hunger isn’t caused by a lack of food, but rather the continued prevalence of poverty.
  6. More than 1 in 5 children is at risk of hunger. Among African-Americans and Latinos, it’s 1 in 3.
  7. Over 20 million children receive free or reduced-price lunch each school day. Less than half of them get breakfast, and only 10% have access to summer feeding sites.
  8. For every 100 school lunch programs, there are only 87 breakfast sites and just 36 summer food programs.
  9. 1 in 7 people are enrolled in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). Nearly half of them are children.
  10. 40% of food is thrown out in the US every year, or about $165 billion worth. All of this uneaten food could feed 25 million Americans.
  11. These 7 states have statistically higher food insecurity rates than the US national average (14.7%): Mississippi (19.2%), Texas (18.5%), Arkansas (19.2%), Alabama (17.4%), Georgia (17.4%), Florida (16.2%), North Carolina (17.1%).

Sources

In 2011 16.7 million children lived in food-insecure households, about 35% more than 2007 levels, though only 1.1% of U.S. children, or 845,000, saw reduced food intake or disrupted eating patterns at some point during the year, and most cases were not chronic.[11]

Almost 16 million children lived in food-insecure households in 2012.[12] Schools throughout the country had 21 million children participate in a free or reduced lunch program and 11 million children participate in a free or reduced breakfast program. The extent of American youth facing hunger is clearly shown through the fact that 47% of SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) participants are under the age of 18.[12] The states with the highest rate of food insecure children were North Dakota, Minnesota, Virginia, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts as of 2012.

Sub-Saharan Africa is the region with the highest prevalence (percentage of population) of hunger. One person in four there is undernourished. Poor nutrition causes nearly half (45%) of deaths in children under five – 3.1 million children each year.

About 21,000 people die every day of hunger or hunger-related causes, according to the United Nations. This is one person every four seconds, as you can see on this display. Sadly, it is children who die most often.

By Rev. Tom Holmes

Donate now to help make a difference.

 

CROP Hunger Walks and What They Have Accomplished

Crop Walk Annual Report PhotoOne of the things we wish to make you aware of, as we start our 2015 campaign, is the work that is accomplished by you and the thousands of people around the United States.

Here is a link to the 2014 Annual Report.  We are fortunate to be able to contribute to the tag line of Ending Hunger One Step At A Time.

We are meeting to get to coordinate the walk and needing volunteers for a variety of tasks to accomplish on the day of the walk.  If you wish to volunteer and/or find out more, please fill out the contact form below.

See you May 3, 2015.